Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Lophophora seedling pictures

One month ago I sowed most of my Lophophora seed for this season and thought I would post some pictures of the minuscule seedlings, only a couple of weeks old.

Lophophora williamsii seedlings (VM 534k; El Oso, Coahuila, Mexico)
Lophophora williamsii seedlings (VM 534k; El Oso, Coahuila, Mexico)

I again bought seeds originating from the L. williamsii population in El Oso, Coahuila as I'm fascinated with the plants described in the booklet The genus Lophophora – Kaktusy Special 2, 2005 - allegedly this variety forms massive clusters with individual heads measuring up to 15 cm in diameter. The two seedlings in the center front of the above photo have grown from the same seed.

Lophophora decipiens sensu Steven Brack
Lophophora decipiens sensu Steven Brack

For a long time I have wanted to grow the Lophophora decipiens offered in the Mesa Garden seed catalog – the plants are alluringly described as “powdery grey”. I have started L. decipiens seeds from Mesa Garden once before but ended up killing off most of the seedlings – to be on the safe side I ordered 100 seeds this time and are going to start them in several, separate batches ;-)

Lophophora fricii seedlings (KS 198; Viesca, Coahuila, Mexico)
Lophophora fricii seedlings (KS 198; Viesca, Coahuila, Mexico)

I'm growing increasingly enchanted with Lophophora fricii but don't really have any mature specimens of this interesting species (except one plant that is almost of flowering size). To amend this I'm starting batches of Lophophora fricii from seed on a regular basis.

Lophophora williamsii seedlings (SB 418; Presidio County, Texas)
Lophophora williamsii seedlings (SB 418; Presidio County, Texas)

The L. williamsii plants from Presidio County, Texas represent the northernmost form of L. williamsii, also known as Lophophora williamsii var. echinata, and is a self-evident candidate for growing in the coldhouse.

3 comments:

  1. fucking super asome
    !!

    ReplyDelete
  2. is there any tips on getting seeds to germinate do you add anything to your gravel mix?

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  3. Usually I use the "bag method" as described in this post. I'm not religious regarding the soil as long as it is well draining - my latest batch of seedlings (the ones pictured in this post) were started in plain, sharp sand. The decisive factors are humidity (hence the sealed plastic bags), light (a day length of at least 13-14 hours - alternatively you can extend day length with artificial lights), and temperature (between 20 and 30 C). And of course viable seeds.

    I would expect the majority of the (viable) seeds to germinate within 2-3 weeks after sowing.

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